Aural hematoma steroid injection

This puffiness is most likely to be due to a hematoma in this ear flap. Hematomas are collections of blood. They are common in ears because there doesn't seem to be anything in the ear to generate enough pressure to stop bleeding until the ear swells enough with blood. Ear infections, ear mites, fly bite irritation, mosquito bites, allergies and immune mediated diseases have all been implicated as underlying causes for this problem. Anything that causes the dog to flap its ears can make this happen and it appears to occur spontaneously in a number of dogs.

I recently read about a new method of dealing with aural hematomas that offers an interesting first-line alternative to surgical repair. A veterinarian sedated the dog, drained the hematoma, flushed out the pocket to remove any remaining debris, and then injected the area with the corticosteroid methylprednisolone acetate. If the hematoma was still present a week later, the procedure was repeated. Any hematomas that had not resolved within 15 days of presentation were treated surgically. Eighteen of the nineteen dogs included in the study responded to this less traumatic method of treatment, although six had relapses within three months.

Some vets will treat aural hematomas with oral steroids (usually prednisone). The prednisone will often take down the swelling. It may take several weeks of medication for the ear to clear up. During this time period the medication helps with pain relief. In most cases the ear heals just as well as with surgery. Medical treatment works best if it is started as soon as possible. Some vets have found that if we try medical treatment on an animal that has gone untreated for a while, the ear will scar just as badly as if nothing had been done.

Due to the complexity of skull base surgery, these procedures are best performed at a tertiary care facility where there is adequate ancillary services available to the neurosurgeon in the management of these patients. Both operative and post-operative care requires expertise not only in the area of neurosurgery but also in the areas of neurophysiology, neurology, neurological oncology, radiation oncology, and intensive care nursing. Phrases used to describe skull base surgery designate the approach the neurosurgeon uses and include midline, paramedian, and extreme far lateral suboccipital, presigmoid, subfrontal, and Dolenc.

Care for an ear after aurcular hematoma surgery is pretty straightforward. If an infection has been diagnosed as the cause of the hematoma, treat the infection as directed. Most of these patients are also on systemic antibiotics, either orally or by use of Convenia long-acting antibiotic injection. Serum often “weeps” from the suture sites and can actually coat the pinna with a crust. Serum must not be allowed to accumulate, and hydrogen peroxide is usually adequate to remove it IF you keep up with daily cleaning. As stated in the Article, we prefer to remove sutures and staples under general anesthesia 3-4 weeks after surgery.

Aural hematoma steroid injection

aural hematoma steroid injection

Due to the complexity of skull base surgery, these procedures are best performed at a tertiary care facility where there is adequate ancillary services available to the neurosurgeon in the management of these patients. Both operative and post-operative care requires expertise not only in the area of neurosurgery but also in the areas of neurophysiology, neurology, neurological oncology, radiation oncology, and intensive care nursing. Phrases used to describe skull base surgery designate the approach the neurosurgeon uses and include midline, paramedian, and extreme far lateral suboccipital, presigmoid, subfrontal, and Dolenc.

Media:

aural hematoma steroid injectionaural hematoma steroid injectionaural hematoma steroid injectionaural hematoma steroid injectionaural hematoma steroid injection

http://buy-steroids.org