Steroid injections in late pregnancy


If you suffer from plantar fasciitis, you might think perhaps you should rest your feet, but it’s actually better for you to keep on the move. Plantar fasciitis affects the band of tissue connecting your heel bone to your toes, and can cause stabbing pains when walking. A treatment for it is to keep moving, but make sure you don’t overdo it. Keep your mileage and speed down if you begin experiencing pain, and place an ice pack under your foot for 15 minutes after you’ve finished walking. An alternative is to roll a frozen bottle of water under your foot for 10 to 15 minutes instead. Adding support to your foot can also help, so using an insole in your shoe or wrapping your foot with athletic tape is also recommended. To find out more about this, read this guide to Walking With Plantar Fasciitis . 

As with any medication, there are possible side effects or risks involved.  Common risks from steroid injections include pain at the injection site, bruising due to broken blood vessels, skin discolouration and aggravation of inflammation.  Rarer risks include allergic reactions, infection, tendon rupture and serious injury to bones called necrosis.  Long term side effects (depending on frequency and dose) include thinning of skin, easy bruising, weight gain, puffiness in the face, higher blood pressure, cataract formation, and osteoporosis (reduced bone density).  Steroid injections may be given every 3-4 months but frequent injections may lead to tissue weakening at the injection site and is not recommended.  Side effects do not happen in everyone and vary from person to person.

Steroid injections in late pregnancy

steroid injections in late pregnancy

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