Steroid responsive nephrotic syndrome

Cells of the zona fasciculata and zona reticularis lack aldosterone synthase (CYP11B2) that converts corticosterone to aldosterone, and thus these tissues produce only the weak mineralocorticoid corticosterone. However, both these zones do contain the CYP17A1 missing in zona glomerulosa and thus produce the major glucocorticoid, cortisol. Zona fasciculata and zona reticularis cells also contain CYP17A1, whose 17,20-lyase activity is responsible for producing the androgens, dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and androstenedione. Thus, fasciculata and reticularis cells can make corticosteroids and the adrenal androgens, but not aldosterone.

References: 1. Bikowski J, Pillai R, Shroot B. The position not the presence of the halogen in corticosteroids influences potency and side effects. J Drugs Dermatol . 2006;5(2):125-130. 2. Del Rosso J, Friedlander SF. Corticosteroids: options in the era of steroid-sparing therapy. J Am Acad Dermatol . 2005; 53(1 Suppl 1):s50-s58. 3. US Food and Drug Administration NDA 017765. Promius Pharma, LLC, Princeton, NJ: Aug 1977. 4. Rosenthal AL. Clocortolone pivalate: a paired comparison clinical trial of a new topical steroid in eczema/atopic dermatitis. Cutis . 1980;25(1):96-98. 5. Kircik LH. A study to assess the occlusivity and moisturization potential of three topical corticosteroid products using the skin trauma after razor shaving (STARS) bioassay. J Drugs Dermatol . 2014;13(5):582-585. 6. Cloderm [package insert]. Princeton, NJ: Promius Pharma, LLC; 2017.

Steroid responsive nephrotic syndrome

steroid responsive nephrotic syndrome

Media:

steroid responsive nephrotic syndromesteroid responsive nephrotic syndromesteroid responsive nephrotic syndromesteroid responsive nephrotic syndromesteroid responsive nephrotic syndrome